Health Services

Health Services

Health Services

Dr. Mitchell Katz

Offering world-class patient-centered care through a network of hospitals and community-based clinics

This past year was a memorable one for the Department of Health Services. Tens of thousands of county residents gained healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act and chose DHS as their provider.

 

True to our mission, we launched the My Health LA program and enrolled more than 80,000 low-income members who didn’t qualify for coverage expansion to ensure their access to comprehensive medical care.

 

With the support of our labor partners, we continued our work to build a stronger health system. More than 470,000 patients are now empaneled in patient-centered primary care homes, where they receive longitudinal care from a team of providers. We deployed a new electronic medical record system, invested in pharmacy automation, unveiled a new outpatient call center system and began a robotic surgery program.

 

We opened a new Emergency and Surgery building at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and two state-of-the-art health centers: the Martin Luther King, Jr. Outpatient Center in South Los Angeles and the High Desert Regional Health Center in Lancaster. Incorporating natural light and art installations, these LEED-certified facilities use less energy, promote healing and redefine perceptions of public facilities.

 

The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Agency began a community paramedicine pilot project to transport lower-acuity patients to alternative care settings, like urgent care centers, that could be a model for other EMS jurisdictions in the state and country.

 

And guided by a “housing first” model, we developed several new supportive housing projects, like the Star apartments in Skid Row, to reduce chronic homelessness. By moving the highest users of emergency services into supportive housing, we decrease medical costs while giving these individuals the dignity they deserve.

 

With the support of the Board of Supervisors and many stakeholders, our county-run health system is on solid ground and poised for a bright future.

Dr. Mitchell H. Katz

Director

Dr. Mitchell Katz

Offering world-class patient-centered care through a network of hospitals and community-based clinics

This past year was a memorable one for the Department of Health Services. Tens of thousands of county residents gained healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act and chose DHS as their provider.

 

True to our mission, we launched the My Health LA program and enrolled more than 80,000 low-income members who didn’t qualify for coverage expansion to ensure their access to comprehensive medical care.

 

With the support of our labor partners, we continued our work to build a stronger health system. More than 470,000 patients are now empaneled in patient-centered primary care homes, where they receive longitudinal care from a team of providers. We deployed a new electronic medical record system, invested in pharmacy automation, unveiled a new outpatient call center system and began a robotic surgery program.

 

We opened a new Emergency and Surgery building at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and two state-of-the-art health centers: the Martin Luther King, Jr. Outpatient Center in South Los Angeles and the High Desert Regional Health Center in Lancaster. Incorporating natural light and art installations, these LEED-certified facilities use less energy, promote healing and redefine perceptions of public facilities.

 

The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Agency began a community paramedicine pilot project to transport lower-acuity patients to alternative care settings, like urgent care centers, that could be a model for other EMS jurisdictions in the state and country.

 

And guided by a “housing first” model, we developed several new supportive housing projects, like the Star apartments in Skid Row, to reduce chronic homelessness. By moving the highest users of emergency services into supportive housing, we decrease medical costs while giving these individuals the dignity they deserve.

 

With the support of the Board of Supervisors and many stakeholders, our county-run health system is on solid ground and poised for a bright future.

Dr. Mitchell H. Katz

Director

Dr. Mitchell Katz

Offering world-class patient-centered care through a network of hospitals and community-based clinics

This past year was a memorable one for the Department of Health Services. Tens of thousands of county residents gained healthcare coverage under the Affordable Care Act and chose DHS as their provider.

 

True to our mission, we launched the My Health LA program and enrolled more than 80,000 low-income members who didn’t qualify for coverage expansion to ensure their access to comprehensive medical care.

 

With the support of our labor partners, we continued our work to build a stronger health system. More than 470,000 patients are now empaneled in patient-centered primary care homes, where they receive longitudinal care from a team of providers. We deployed a new electronic medical record system, invested in pharmacy automation, unveiled a new outpatient call center system and began a robotic surgery program.

 

We opened a new Emergency and Surgery building at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and two state-of-the-art health centers: the Martin Luther King, Jr. Outpatient Center in South Los Angeles and the High Desert Regional Health Center in Lancaster. Incorporating natural light and art installations, these LEED-certified facilities use less energy, promote healing and redefine perceptions of public facilities.

 

The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Agency began a community paramedicine pilot project to transport lower-acuity patients to alternative care settings, like urgent care centers, that could be a model for other EMS jurisdictions in the state and country.

 

And guided by a “housing first” model, we developed several new supportive housing projects, like the Star apartments in Skid Row, to reduce chronic homelessness. By moving the highest users of emergency services into supportive housing, we decrease medical costs while giving these individuals the dignity they deserve.

 

With the support of the Board of Supervisors and many stakeholders, our county-run health system is on solid ground and poised for a bright future.

Dr. Mitchell H. Katz

Director

290000
Uninsured residents enrolled in health coverage
150
Certified medical assistants trained
10000
Intake health assessments completed
290000
Uninsured residents enrolled in health coverage
150
Certified medical assistants trained
10000
Intake health assessments completed
290000
Uninsured residents enrolled in health coverage
150
Certified medical assistants trained
10000
Intake health assessments completed